Sunday, May 20, 2012

Belgium in the news, week 20

6 comments:

  1. 6 million. Never forget.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26WnRGhxDIs
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BL8hZ2sgpLM

    This is a poem in Yiddish written by Mordechai Gebirtig, a Jewish Polish poet. it was written in 1938 after Nazi's burnt a village (shtetl) down. The cry for help still reverbs. This song is sung with deep emotion in every holocaust rememberance day.

    The second video is a very controversial one by Salem, an extreme metal band from Israel who had connections with Euronymous (Mayhem) at some point. He even offered them relocation to Norway to join the black metal circle but then Varg (Burzum) sent them a message that he loved their heavy music but disliked their anti-holocaust message. The Israeli band obviously was outraged by that comment and never accepted the offer to join Mayhem and co in Norway (even though their website contains a picture of Mayhem vocalist "Dead" wearing a fan shirt of Salem). Varg reacted by sending a mail bomb to Salem vocalist Ze'ev Tenenboim which was luckily stopped by Israeli postal services. I don't know if they kept in touch with Euronymous but obviously they never accepted the relocation to Norway to join the black metal circle.

    Ha'Ayara Bo'Eret is the Hebrew translation of S'Brennt. The song is a metal cover with images of the concentration camps. The song stirred up so much controversy that the Israeli parliament debated if a metal band should cover such a song. When it was clear the band had best intentions (making sure young Israelis who listen to metal would never forget the holocaust) the band was given green light despite the controversy. The video is not for sensitive eyes, I warn you. On my blog "The Paths Less Travelled" I think I have an article on the song or at least a half-finished article which will be published soon. Salem released a whole concept album about the holocaust called "Kaddish" which is named after a prayer in Aramic language often recited during holocaust rememberance days.

    The lyrics translated more or less:

    Burn, brothers, burn!
    Our little village is burning
    Black spirts are raging through it
    The flames of destruction are raging
    No traces will be left from the fire
    And you watch without offering help
    Without stretching your hands to help stop the fire
    The fire of our little town

    Burn, brothers, burn!
    Because the hour is chas ve chalila near
    As the flames will continue and destroy us all
    Only walls will testify what has once been
    And you watch without offering help
    Without stretching your hands to help stop the fire
    The fire of our little town

    Burn, brothers, it's burning!
    Only in your hands lies salvation
    Quick, stretch your hands and stop the fire
    With your blood, stop the fire
    Stop the fire with your blood, don't stay at a distance
    Because the flames are raging higher
    It is burning! (literally ; more proper translation: "The fire is high!")




    No matter what connection they had at some point with Euronymous (they never moved to Norway and declined the invitation anyways) and no matter to see that idiot "Dead" at their website... This cover is amazing as it will assure that a young audience listening to totally different music than back in the war days, will never forget the horrors that happened.

    Mordechai Gebirtig (who wrote the original poem in Yiddish) sadly enough died in the camps during the world war.

    Never forget. Never ever forget. Never let this happen again. Not to the Jews. Not to anyone.

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  2. PS to my initial post: "chas ve chalila" is the only part not possible to translate. It is a typical Hebrew expression for expressing the hope that something terrible will not happen.

    In this context "The hour is chas ve chalila near" it is to be interpretated as "The hour (of destruction) is near, please don't let this happen". it's almost like a cry to god to stop something horrible from happening.

    I'm not sure how it's possible to translate that one but this PS should make it clear.

    Yes, studying Hebrew indeed can be helpful sometimes to decipher songs, although for some parts of the song I had to ask help from a native speaker. I fully mastered the Hebrew alphabet but learn new words every class...

    Anyways, I echo my own words. NEVER FORGET. NEVER LET THIS HAPPEN AGAIN. NEVER A NEW HOLOCAUST!

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  6. Thanks for the poem, the songs and the Salem story, Gerrit. I am sorry that I took so long to sort out the problem with the comments. It won't happen again.

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